by Molly Engel

by Diane Callahan

Coupled

Look over the bridge’s edge:
babbling stream in quiet conversation
with the stones below.

Look up to the darkened canopy:
leaves shudder beneath small rain,
and thin trees twist into an embrace.

Look inward, beyond that earthy musk:
maybe the only cure for loneliness
grows from the acorns at your feet.

***

Because of That Smile

I hope I am reincarnated
as something besides, say,
a mosquito
or sea slug
so I could continue to express
my love for you
in whatever way possible,
whether that be a flash of feathers
or a dog’s devotion.

***

The Geometry of Love

Some say it’s a circle—
wedding bands
perfect and unbroken.

Or perhaps it’s a triangle containing
defined corners,
lines you cross or won’t cross.

People talk about love
in terms of squares and rectangles,
as a foundation, a cornerstone—
the most stolid and solid of shapes.

But lines are too stark, too plain.
Lines are lifeless,
dead,
static.

The geometry of love,
real love, not simply
a companionship of convenience,
is a fractal.

Like a kaleidoscope,
it is a dizzying pattern alive
with complicated angles and never-ending,
always-changing replications spinning
in their own complicated directions.

Like a kaleidoscope, when you turn love
to examine it from another angle,
the same elements that composed it the day before—
thought and emotion and desire and need,
those sharp little stones of personality,
multicolored and multifaceted—
make it up the next day, yet
their relation to each other has changed;
they have tumbled and interlocked,
producing a new pattern
no less brilliant
but still wholly new.

Love is infinite variation,
a fantastic equation of unfolding
symmetry.

 

Image: Molly Engel is a Philadelphia native who transplanted to Portland, Oregon where she works full-time as a nurse and part-time at a bouldering gym. When not at the gym or the hospital she likes to drink coffee, spend time with her cats, explore the outdoors, and climb with friends. She has been taking pictures since she was thirteen, and after an introductory photography class in college she fell in love with the 35mm format. Find her work (all shot on a Pentax K1000) on Instagram @mollyonfilm.